Tag archive: employers

President Trump Nominates Scott Mugno of FedEx to Head OSHA

On Monday, October 27, 2017, President Trump nominated Scott Mugno, currently the vice-president for safety at FedEx Ground, to be the new head of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Mugno is well known in Washington among members of business-oriented organizations. So, what does this mean for employers? Well, Jordan Barab, Deputy Assistant Secretary…

Federal Contractors: Are You Complying With New Paid Sick Leave Requirements?

Executive Order 13706 established paid sick leave requirements for federal contractors and subcontractors and went into effect on January 1, 2017. Non-complying contractors are subject to monetary damages, attorneys’ fees, equitable relief, and/or debarment from future contracts. How Many Hours Of Paid Sick Leave Are Required? Fifty-six (56) hours annually. Unless employers elect to give…

A Primer on the New Missouri Right to Work Law

What does Right to Work Mean?

Employers are barred from: requiring employees to become, remain, or refrain from becoming a member of a labor organization; or pay dues or other charges required of labor organization members as a condition of employment.

EMPLOYER ALERT: It May Soon Be Illegal to Ask Potential Employees to Disclose Their Previous Salary

On August 1, 2016, Massachusetts became the first state to bar employers from asking about an applicant’s salary before offering them a job. Bill S.2119, which goes into effect January 1, 2018, states that it shall be an unlawful practice for an employer to seek the wage or salary history of a prospective employee from the prospective employee or a current or former employer. The law does not prohibit prospective employees from voluntarily disclosing such information. Further, an employer may seek or confirm a prospective employee’s wage or salary history after an offer of employment with compensation has been negotiated.

New Illinois Child Bereavement Leave

Governor Bruce Rauner signed the Child Bereavement Leave Act into law on July 29, 2016. The Law requires employers with at least fifty (50) employees to provide up to ten (10) working days of unpaid leave for the loss of a child.

EMPLOYER ALERT: Remember EEO-1 Reports Are Due September 30th And Beware For Next Year— Substantial New Wage Reporting Responsibilities Are On The Horizon

The September 30, 2016, due date for employers to file their annual EEO-1 reports with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is on the near horizon. Private employers with 100 or more employees, and federal government contractors or first-tier subcontractors with 50 or more employees and a contract/subcontract of $50,000 or more, should take the appropriate measures to file their reports on time.

Keep Your Workplace Safe — OHSA At It Again!

The anti-business Occupational Safety and Health Administration continues its onslaught of burdensome regulations on American business. The “stick it to the company” philosophy is no more evident than with its new increased penalties. As of August 1, 2016, OSHA penalties will increase.

Employers: Watch Out For The New Persuader Rules

On March 23, 2016, the Department of Labor issues its new “persuader” rule which has been the matter of much controversy since 2011. The persuader rule is designed to implement Section 203(b) of the Labor Management Reporting and Disclosure Act of 1959. A prior rule existed, but the Obama Department of Labor thought that it did not go far enough (translation: did not favor organized labor sufficiently – writer’s opinion).

Illinois Blood Donation Leave

It is becoming increasingly difficult for Illinois employers to keep up with the numerous Illinois leave laws. Here is one you may not know about – The Illinois’ Employee Blood Donation Leave Act. There is no corresponding federal law.

Health Care Alert: OSHA Targets Healthcare Facilities

OSHA administrator David Michaels has stated, “It’s time for hospitals and the health care industry to make the changes necessary to protect their workers.” Workers’ injury rates at nursing and residential care facilities are more than twice that of the overall private industry, and hospital workers face a rate nearly as high, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Therefore, OSHA has decided to target hospital and nursing facility for inspections on hazards that contribute to the industry’s high injury rate. To address these injuries, an internal OSHA memorandum directs compliance officers to target hospitals and nursing facilities and inspect the following hazards:

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This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship. © 2014 Sandberg Phoenix & von Gontard P.C. All Rights Reserved.

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