Recognizing that every business with employees faces challenges that can impact their growth and profitability, Sandberg Phoenix attorneys are committed to sharing their knowledge of, experience with and passion for employment law. Addressing current issues, recent case studies and matters of statutory and regulatory compliance, the Employer Law Blog provides expert advice and analysis of important aspects of employment law.

Timm Schowalter Discusses Transgender Bathrooms on KMOX

Tune into KMOX’s Total Information AM on September 2nd for a discussion with Sandberg Phoenix’s Timm Schowalter on transgender bathroom use.

And an Arbitration Agreement Is Enforced

Employee arbitration provisions and agreements have been under increased scrutiny. However, in a 2015 case, Hewitt v. Honorable Kristine Kerr, the Missouri Supreme Court enforced an agreement to arbitrate against a former employee of St. Louis Rams. The case is a helpful refresher on Missouri law on arbitration agreements for employers who wish to arbitrate employment claims.

Pay Me! Should Interns be Paid? A New Test

Plaintiffs were unpaid interns on the Fox Searchlight distributed film Black Swan. The U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York found the Black Swan interns were employees under the Fair Labor Standards Act and New York Labor Law. The court applied a version of the U.S. Labor Department’s six factor test, which was derived from the 68 year-old Supreme Court decision Walling v. Portland Terminal Co., 330 U.S. 148 (1947), to determine whether the interns fell within an exception for unpaid trainees.

FMLA – Curing a Deficient Medical Certification

Your employee requests Family Medical Leave and presents you with a medical certification that is deficient. What do you do?

Can you Fire Someone for a Facebook Post?

The NLRB recently told an Illinois hotel – NO!

A banquet server at the hotel gathered with other employees in the hallway for a break during a work day that had already lasted 14 hours. The server posted a photograph of the workers on her Facebook page, adding the comment “That’s how we work at TPCC.” The photo made it appear several employees were not working, but the server later testified that she was making a joke about employees who had already worked very hard that day. Several co-workers posted comments on the post.

EEOC Must Try to Conciliate

Before suing an employer, the EEOC must first endeavor to eliminate the alleged unlawful employment practice by informal methods of conference, conciliation and persuasion. 42 U.S.C. 2000e-5. The MaEEOC may only file suit after determining that attempts to conciliate have failed.

Suspicions and Assumptions About an Applicants Religious Practices Can Lead to Title VII Liability for Employers

The Supreme Court recently ruled in E.E.O.C. v. Abercrombie & Fitch Stores, that a job applicant only had to show that the need for a religious accommodation was a motivating factor in the prospective employer’s decision to not hire the applicant in order to prove a violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, and not that the employer had actual knowledge of the applicants need for an accommodation based upon one’s religious practice. Title VII prohibits a prospective employer from refusing to hire a applicant because of the applicant’s religious practice when the practice could be accommodated without undue hardship.

Employer Alert: OSHA Speaks Out on Transgender Bathroom Guidelines

On June 1, 2015, The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) released “A Guide to Restroom Access for Transgender Workers”. Under current federal law, employers are required to provide all employees reasonable access to restroom facilities. Now under OSHA’s “model practices” for employers to follow when providing access to restrooms by transgender employees, including:

Personnel Records 101

An employee (or former employee) wants to see their personnel records. Now what?

First step – read the Illinois Personnel Records Review Act (before the employee makes the request).
It is found at 805 ILCS 40.

Here are some highlights of that Act.

Who can ask?

A current employee

DOL Proposes to More Than Double Minimum Salary Requirement

To be classified as an employee exempt from overtime, an employee must perform certain exempt duties and responsibilities, such as those customarily performed by an executive, professional or administrative employee. In addition to performing the requisite managerial duties, an employer is required to pay the individual a minimum guaranteed weekly salary. If the employee does not receive this minimum weekly salary, the employee is treated as an hourly employee, regardless of their duties, and must be paid overtime for all hours worked in excess of 40 hours during the workweek.

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ILLINOIS

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The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation.
This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship. © 2014 Sandberg Phoenix & von Gontard P.C. All Rights Reserved.

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