Category archive: Employer

Federal Contractors: Are You Complying With New Paid Sick Leave Requirements?

Executive Order 13706 established paid sick leave requirements for federal contractors and subcontractors and went into effect on January 1, 2017. Non-complying contractors are subject to monetary damages, attorneys’ fees, equitable relief, and/or debarment from future contracts. How Many Hours Of Paid Sick Leave Are Required? Fifty-six (56) hours annually. Unless employers elect to give…

A Primer on the New Missouri Right to Work Law

What does Right to Work Mean?

Employers are barred from: requiring employees to become, remain, or refrain from becoming a member of a labor organization; or pay dues or other charges required of labor organization members as a condition of employment.

New Illinois Labor and Employment Laws Effective January 1, 2017

A slew of new laws went into effect on January 1 in Illinois. Below are key labor and employment laws:

FMLA Update: Critical Analysis of Voluntary Overtime Becoming Mandatory for Calculating Intermittent FMLA Leave Benefits

Recently, in Hernandez v. Bridgestone Americas Tire Operations, LLC, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit held that where overtime is considered mandatory an employer may deduct missed shifts from an employee’s allotted intermittent leave allotment under the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA), but that the employer must also include mandatory overtime hours when calculating an employee’s total FMLA-leave allotment. Failure to do so constitutes an FMLA interference claim.

FMLA Breach: HR Director May Be Liable As An “Employer”

A recent federal circuit court of appeals decision shows a growing change in how courts define an “employer” for the purpose of establishing liability under the Family and Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”).

Employers: Watch Out For The New Persuader Rules

On March 23, 2016, the Department of Labor issues its new “persuader” rule which has been the matter of much controversy since 2011. The persuader rule is designed to implement Section 203(b) of the Labor Management Reporting and Disclosure Act of 1959. A prior rule existed, but the Obama Department of Labor thought that it did not go far enough (translation: did not favor organized labor sufficiently – writer’s opinion).

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The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation.
This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship. © 2014 Sandberg Phoenix & von Gontard P.C. All Rights Reserved.

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